Learn how and when to remove this template message, Personal Epistemology: The Psychology of Beliefs About Knowledge and Knowing, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Epistemological_psychology&oldid=919774332, Articles lacking sources from August 2007, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 5 October 2019, at 18:26. Episteme psychology was established as a separate discipline in the late 1980s through the work of v.d. Stok v. Altenæ. This question is several millennia old, and among the most prominent in epistemology. By ignoring ego interests the core impetus or the essence of a deed, real or imagined, is recovered. The inkling is presumed to trigger an affect which encapsulates and saturates all human experience. Psychology Definition of EPISTEMOLOGY: Branch of philiosophy concerning the nature, origin and limitations of knowledge and justification of truth claims. More specifically, it is the philosophical field concerned with the nature, origin and limitations of knowledge. In everyday life, inklings induce detection either via human enactments (through habitual behavior) or through spontaneous devotion (conscious expression in the arts). Epistemological psychology is a multi-sided perspective in psychology uncovering simple primary hidden inklings (images) in ideas, actions, feelings and all social interactions. Epistemological psychology is a multi-sided perspective in psychology uncovering simple primary hidden inklings (images) in ideas, actions, feelings and all social interactions. The first issue epistemology must address is the question of what knowledge is. The term episteme is related to the Greek word επιστήμη, which translates literally as standing near or by that which causes but is often simplified as knowledge or science. Epistemology in Psychology Epistemology is the study of knowledge. Episteme psychology began with the 1940s written works of Gaston Bachelard, whose many books focused on poetics and (day-) dreaming.