The bad news is the way it does it is it provides them with subsidies that taxpayers pay so they can get that insurance — or in the case of people who are poor, a 100 percent subsidy — by expanding the Medicaid program, so that the taxpayers are paying for tens of millions of new customers to pay the same exorbitant prices and fees that everybody else has been paying. "At that moment I wasn't worried about costs; I wasn't worried about a cost benefit analysis of this drug or this medical device; I wasn't worried about health care policy," Brill says. The dirty little secret is that the exact same prescription drug in the United States is typically 40 or 50 percent less in Canada, in the United Kingdom, in France, in Germany and Australia — in every other country in the world because every other country in the world controls the price of monopoly drugs. Introduction. Despite being an acclaimed reporter, Brill does not write well. It's hard to understand why you get 36 different first-class envelopes with 36 different pieces of paper from the same insurance company on the same day. He founded and ran Court TV, The American Lawyer magazine, ten regional legal newspapers, and Brill’s Content magazine. Brill had a bubble on his heart that the doctors said had a 15 to 17 percent chance of bursting each year, he says. They would now show up with insurance. . Yes. [Brill’s] book brims with unconventional insight delivered in prose completely uninfected by the worn out tropes and tired lingo of the Sunday shows.”—The Daily Beast “This is one of the most important books of our time. But then, as you open each envelope, they're as completely unintelligible to me as they are to you, as they are to everyone listening. . I don't think ultimately any of those challenges are threats in the sense that it will be repealed. The article Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us won a National Magazine Award. It is full of insights, contradictions, apologias, flashes of anger, tidbits of history, extended stories of awe, compassion, some glibness and moments of brilliance. I have no idea why they sent this to you. Thus, this also becomes the story of how one patient who thinks he knows everything about healthcare “policy” rethinks it from a hospital gurney—and combines that insight with his brilliant reporting. . For its insights into our nation’s fiscal, psychological and corporeal health—and for our own long-term social well-being—it is a book that deserves to be read and discussed widely by anyone interested in the politics and policy of healthcare.”—Los Angeles Times“A sweeping and spirited new book [that] chronicles the surprisingly juicy tale of reform . The [prescription] drugs that I was given ... have humongous profit margins and we have done nothing in this country, unlike every other country in the free world, to control that because we have lived with the illusion that health care can be a free market. It’s a penetrating chronicle of how the profiteering that Brill first identified in his trailblazing Time magazine cover story continues, despite Obamacare. persuasive, shocking.”—The New York Times America’s Bitter Pill is Steven Brill’s acclaimed book on how the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was written, how it is being implemented, and, most important, how it is changing—and failing to change—the rampant abuses in the healthcare industry. Posted on March 23, 2013 by dubrava. A Riveting, Deeply Personal Account of History in the Making, Tieghan Gerard's Guide to a Small but Special Meal at Home. That is, this is not a political issue for him–he doesn’t take sides, other than recognizing that health care costs are heading our country for a disaster. Buy, NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK • “A tour de force . NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK • America’s Bitter Pill is Steven Brill’s acclaimed book on how the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was written, how it is being implemented, and, most important, how it is changing—and failing to change—the rampant abuses in the healthcare industry. He teaches journalism at Yale. . So much of what is in this book could… The insurance companies are not really the bad actors in this movie. And it's not like people wander into the emergency room because they want to get something for free — nobody does that voluntarily. Brill's surgery happened not long after he had written a special report for Time magazine investigating the inflated charges in hospital bills. His total bill was about $190,000, he says. a comprehensive and suitably furious guide to the political landscape of American healthcare . By clicking SIGN UP, I acknowledge that I have read and agree to Penguin Random House’s, Editor's Picks: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Stories Read By Your Favorite Celebrities, Discover Book Picks from the CEO of Penguin Random House US. The law enables millions more people to afford health insurance, he writes, but it also adds new layers of bureaucracy — and many confusing new regulations. Sixty percent of the personal bankruptcies in the United States are the result of health care bills. On how the Affordable Care Act affects taxes. “America’s Bitter Pill” is an energetic, picaresque, narrative explanation of much of what has happened in the last seven years of health policy. And it's a longtime national disgrace that we're the only developed country where tens of millions of our citizens can't get health care. So much of what is in this book could… It should be required reading for anyone who cares about our healthcare system.”—Walter Isaacson “Superb . The insurance companies are in many ways like us: They pay health care bills. While reporting on the rollout of the Affordable Care Act, journalist Steven Brill was diagnosed with a life-threatening condition that required heart surgery. hide caption. . In a gripping narrative, his thorough reporting is made all the more powerful by his own scary experience looking up from a gurney.”—Arianna Huffington, Sign up for news about books, authors, and more from Penguin Random House, Visit other sites in the Penguin Random House Network. But by chance America’s Bitter Pill ends up being much more—because as Brill was completing this book, he had to undergo urgent open-heart surgery. Now it is up to the administration to prove him wrong about what the legislation does to the trajectory of health-care costs.”—Peter R. Orszag, Bloomberg View  “Brill’s book performs an admirable job of getting behind the scenes. We cannot pay for this. NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK • America’s Bitter Pill is Steven Brill’s acclaimed book on how the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was written, how it is being implemented, and, most important, how it is changing—and failing to change—the rampant abuses in the healthcare industry. The first way to look at it, which is certainly the way I was looking at it the morning after my surgery and ... eight days later when I walked out of that place a healthy person, is that those people saved my life. “America’s Bitter Pill” is an energetic, picaresque, narrative explanation of much of what has happened in the last seven years of health policy.